Nu är jag på Arlanda, på väg mot Madrid för att möta upp bandet Twilight Force. Sen väntar drygt en beckas turné med dem.

Becky Hansmeyer has an interesting approach to her review of the new MacBook Pro.

This isn’t going to be your typical MacBook review because there are plenty of those out there and most of them are very good. This review is for people who don’t give two craps how this year’s model compares to last year’s model and instead want to know how this year’s model compares to their crusty old ThickBook Pro from five years ago because that’s the one they’re upgrading from. Cool? Cool.

A Review of the 2016 13″ MacBook Pro with Touch Bar | Becky Hansmeyer

At one point in Rogue One, Galen Erso explicitly invokes the justification that they’d find someone else to do this work anyway. It sounds a lot like Tim Cook’s memo to Apple staff justifying his presence at a roundtable gathering that legitimised the election of a misogynist bigot to the highest office in the land. I’m sure that Tim Cook, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Sheryl Sandberg all think they are playing the part of Galen Erso but I wonder if they’ll soon find themselves indistinguishable from Orson Krennic.

Adactio: Journal—Going rogue

Interesting piece by Jeremy Keith. I think all of us, regardless of what line of business we’re in, should consider whether the work we do for a living results in something that we really can stand behind, morally speaking. And if it doesn’t, perhaps we should try, if possible, to find something else to do to pay the bills.

The message is clear. The only web site that you can trust to last and have your interests at heart is the web site with your name on it.

Medium may not last | Manton Reece

I agree, and Manton’s upcoming Micro.blog seems like a great place to go for this.

If you haven’t yet backed Manton’s Kickstarter you really should. Sure, it’s already way past its funding goal, but by adding you money to the pile you’ll help show Manton that there’s a big demand for this kind of service.

Manton Reece has finally launched the Kickstarter for his Micro.blog project (formerly Snippets.today). If, like me, you’re interested in the open web and a more decentralized future online you should back this project. I think Manton’s onto something big, something much more sustainable then the good old Twitter clones.

Hi, my name is Manton Reece, and I’m writing a book called Indie Microblogging. I’m also launching a brand new platform for microblogs.

[…]

I want to encourage more independent writing. To do that, we need better tools that embrace microblogs and the advantages of the open web. We need to learn from the success and user experience of social networking, but applied to the full scope of the web.

I first set out to build a new service just for microblogs. It has a timeline experience like a social network, with replies and favorites, but it’s based on RSS, with the main posts pulled from independent sites.

Indie Microblogging: owning your short-form writing by Manton Reece — Kickstarter

Min vän Emil har skrivit ett inlägg om WordCamp 2016 där han tar upp sin känsla av att konferensen inte går tillräckligt på djupet. Jag vet inte med på WordCamp i år men det var precis den känslan jag hade det året då jag var med, så jag misstänker att jag hade hållit med honom i år också.

Jason Snell of Six Colors made a YouTube video as a companion to his MacBook Pro with a touch bar review. In the video he demonstrates how the touch bar behaves in different situations.

Depending on third party adoption of the touch bar, and whether Apple will roll it out to its entire product line fast enough or not, it may either be a very interning new paradigm for computer interaction or it will be a footnote on the road to touch screens everywhere.

Dear internet, just because something isn’t spelled out in a movie doesn’t make it a plot hole. A plot hole is when it contradicts itself.

I’m still playing Twilight Princess even though I haven’t blogged about it for almost a month. I’ve intended to but haven’t gotten around to it and rather then spend time blogging about playing, up until now I’ve chosen to play it instead.

Once more, this is a game that I think is better the less you know about it so if you haven’t played it and think that you sometime, maybe, possibly, will, stop reading.

So I’ve kept playing and I’ve finished the first two dungeons and I’m getting ready to head for the third one. As far as I can tell I’ve expelled all twilight from Hyrule, so I don’t think I’ll play as a wolf anymore. So far the game is really great. It’s one of my favorite Zelda game, maybe my absolute favorite. I like the darkness and despair about it. It’s gotten me a lot more emotionally invested in the game than I usually are in a Zelda game. The only other time that I’ve actually cared this much about the characters in the game has been Majora’s Mask, hence my idea for the perfect three days, inspired by Groundhog Day.

I like that I know so little, that everything that happens catches me by surprise and that I have very little idea of how far I’ve actually made it into the game. From what the game tells me, this third dungeon will be the last one but based on previous games I might just as well be less than half-way through at this point.

The combats are really intense, both as a wolf and as a human/hylian. Most of the combats feel very intense and the wiimote control scheme makes them feel a bit more real than in other games. You could argue, as some do, that modern Zelda game has lost some of the free world exploration that was such a big part of the first game and if you look at it that way, Twilight Princess is very low on free exploration. There are obstacles spread out all over that makes your path through both the overworld and various underworlds vary linear. However, this does not take away anything from my excitement of playing it. Sure it would be nice to be more free to explore, but I still feel like I’m making the decisions, so I’m happy.

The game also keeps me on the edge of my seat because I feel like I really, really don’t want to die in it and it feels very possible that I might in encounters every now and then. I don’t know if I missed something or if it’s by design, but so far I haven’t manage to find any fairy to keep in a bottle, so I don’t have the usual ”insurance” that I tend to have in Zelda games.

And one more thing, the Shadow Beasts are really creepy! Really, really creepy.

If there’s anything negative to say about the game it’s the fact that some puzzles are hard in a way that doesn’t feel fair. Today I needed to google something for the first time in it. I had no idea about how to taw the Zora’s. (Here’s what I found online. It felt like a failure but I had tried and tried and pondered the puzzle over and over again and when I read the solution I was glad that I did google it. There’s no way I could have figured that out on my own, unless I’ve replayed the game from start and kept playing at a more regular pace. As things are now I’m playing once a week, tops. That means I forget things like a burning lava rock next to a warp portal.

And I’m also very confused by where I’m allowed to start if I’m saving and quitting, so that means I tend to not play if I don’t know that I can put at least two hours into the game.